what'll you have?

Once you find something that suits you, that perfectly satisfies your taste, you tend to stick with it and it becomes your go-to... your usual. After lots of taste tests, on all kinds of food, we found ourselves continually coming back to this spice, and it earned the nick name "The Usual", which ended up sticking. It really does go perfect with damn near anything.

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Here's the Rub

Fire Smoke Society Spices

We don’t care if you cook in a $10,000 pellet powered monstrosity with a ten-speed transmission and wi-fi or a wooden stick over a campfire, this stuff will make your food taste good.

rub it on

the hot line is ringing

Coming Soon! A few drops of this blistering blend kicks up wings, tacos, dry-rubbed ribs, all things eggs and breakfast cocktails (that’s you, Bloody Mary!).

Get spicy with it

slather it up with sauce

Inspired by our insatiable thirst for craft brews, our robust and distinctive sauces rely on three of the best—Stout, IPA, and Pilsner—to create a finger-licking finish for ribs, a mustardy wet rub for slow-smoked pork, and citrusy glaze for chicken wings and more.

get saucy

Fire & Smoke Society Recipes

Paula: Black beans, gooey cheese, barbecue sauce...this spicy, satisfying one-skillet meal pushes all the right buttons. Lightly adapted from my friend Ali Slagle’s Cheesy, Spicy Black Bean Bake this recipe is easy to assemble (from pantry ingredients), and a crowd pleaser for game day or binge watching your favorite Netflix series (“Parks and Rec,” anyone?).

For the best flavor, be sure to fry the garlic until it's deeply golden and saute the tomato paste and spices until they’re very fragrant. A splash of Tupelo Two-Step, our hot honey barbecue sauce, pulls all the flavors together. Sure, you could bake the skillet in the oven, but the final results will be tastier if you allow the mixture to meld on the grill, over indirect heat, absorbing the flavor of a charcoal fire.

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Paula: In most recipes, grilled meats are brushed with sauce towards the end of the cooking process so the sweetners (sugar, honey, molasses, etc.) don’t scorch and blacken over the fire. This time-honored method is solid, but what if you want your chicken to sing with more sauce? Marinating chicken thighs (or drumsticks) in sauce infuses the meat with a deeper hot-sweet flavor and results in a richer, more tender texture. To avoid the scorched skin scenario, cook the chicken over indirect heat.

Bonus: the meat needs less babysitting (“can I get anyone another beer?”), because it’s cooking at more moderate heat. If the skin needs additional crisping, give the thighs a quick spin over direct heat the last few minutes of cooking, flipping as needed to prevent the skin from becoming overly black.

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